Month: June 2021

  • Magic Michalak back with a bang

    first_imgRival: Wilkinson has company at ToulonHe’s back now, not for Toulouse but for Toulon, for whom he signed two months ago. Where that leaves Jonny Wilkinson we’ll have to wait and see. One of the reasons Michalak allegedly left Toulouse was his displeasure at being used as a scrum-half. He sees himself as a fly-half and that’s where he wants to play at Toulon – under Bernard Laporte, his old boss when he starred for Les Bleus.A decade ago the erratic Frenchman and the obsessive Englishman were fierce enemies on the international field and it was Wilkinson who ultimately triumphed, most memorably on a wet Sydney night in 2003 when England knocked France out of the World Cup semi-final. Maybe Michalak will take his revenge next season by condemning his old adversary to that most ignominious of places for a professional sportsman – the bench. Toulon’s player Jonny Wilkinson (foreground) runs with the ball during the French Top 14 rugby union semi-final match vs Clermont, on June 3, 2012 at the municipal stadium in the French southwestern city of Toulouse. Toulon won 15-12. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/GettyImages) Point proven: Michalak notched up 19 points in his first international start since 2007By Gavin MortimerFREDDIE’S BACK! Just a week after we were pondering the future of French flair, Frederic Michalak orchestrated a thumping 49-10 win for France in Tucuman of all places. Not many countries hammer the Pumas on their own patch, let alone Tucuman, a roughhouse of a town in the north-west of Argentina.But France did, running up a record winning margin against Argentina and levelling the two Test series after defeat in the first encounter the previous week. And it was Michalak – 11 years after his international  debut – at the heart of the six try rout, craftily creating the openings for the French three quarters from fly-half while also racking up 19 points.The 29-year-old was ably assisted by his half-back partner, Maxime Machenaud, appearing in his first Test and marking the occasion with a try.Sacre bleu: Lievremont was no fan of MichalakMachenaud is a little known name to British rugby fans having hitherto played his rugby at unfashionable Bordeaux and then Agen. But the 23-year-old joined Racing Metro last month so he’ll have the chance to showcase his talents in next season’s Heineken Cup. Beware Munster, Edinburgh and Saracens, the boy can play a bit.So can Michalak, of course, though in recent seasons Europe has seen scandalously little of arguably the most gifted northern hemisphere fly-half of his generation. Incredible to think that last Saturday’s match in Tucuman was Michalak’s first start for France since the 2007 World Cup. Incredible and a terrible indictment on the shambolic coaching tenure of Marc Lievremont. Lievremont took charge of Les Bleus in the immediate aftermath of the 2007 World Cup, a tournament in which – if you remember – a moment of Michalak magic in the quarter-final enabled France to see off the All Blacks. His reward for that piece of artistry was to be dumped by the ultra-conservative Lievremont, a sorry excuse for a coach who preferred his fly-halves predicatable and pedestrian: think Lionel Beauxis, David Skrela and Francois Trinh-Duc, a trio of players who however hard they practise will never possess Michalak’s instinctive brilliance.Admittedly a spell playing in South Africa in 2008 didn’t help Michalak’s cause even though he played in a Natal side that won the Currie Cup. Lievremont didn’t care because his face didn’t fit; too flaky, too maverick, too…Michalak. In the four seasons that Lievremont was in charge of France Michalak featured just five times, and all as a sub. Small wonder he packed his bags and headed back to Natal in 2011. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

  • Hit and miss for French in Heineken Cup

    first_imgPool Five: Clermont are in control of this pool, the only side in the competition so far to have taken a maximum ten points from the opening two rounds. Having collected a bonus point in their rout of the Scarlets on the opening weekend, Clermont did the same at Exeter despite a valiant first-half performance from the English side. The 46-12 victory leaves Clermont two points clear of Leinster with the two heavyweights squaring up in December on successive weekends. Leinster must travel to France for the first encounter on December 9 before Clermont head to Dublin the following week, and Clermont coach Vern Cotter can’t wait. “Two years ago we were a little bit affected by the atmosphere [in the Aviva Stadium] and the occasion got to us,” he said. “This time we’ll have been warned.”Pool Six: Toulon dominate the last of the pools after they backed up victory over Montpellier with a solid if unspectacular win in Cardiff. “It wasn’t our best match of the season,” conceded coach Bernard Laporte, “but we’ve achieved what we wanted. We’ve practically eliminated a rival for qualification and our objective of reaching the last eight is nearer.” Toulon’s  22-14 victory means they are five points clear of French rivals Montpellier in second place and a trip to Sale on December 8 shouldn’t be too daunting for  Laporte’s side given the way the Sharks capitulated 33-18 to Montpellier. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Top form: Clermont’s Damien Chouly handing off Exeter’s Matt Jess during Round 2 of the Heineken CupBy Gavin MortimerTWO ROUNDS gone and four to go in the group stage of the Heineken Cup, and while some clubs are looking good others (no names mentioned, Edinburgh) are still looking for a point – any point. And the French clubs? There’s been the odd French farce but in the case of Toulon and Clermont it’s been nothing but force.Pool One: Racing Metro’s 30-13 defeat to Saracens in Brussels leaves the Parisian outfit five points behind leaders Sarries but the French side still have an outside chance of making the quarter-finals. Back to back matches against pointless Edinburgh await Racing in December, while Saracens and Munster slug it out on successive weekends. “It’s not over,” said Racing’s Argentine centre Fabrice Estebanez when asked about their prospects of reaching the last eight. “We have great hopes, we must convert these [into victories].”Pool Two: Toulouse top the pool having followed up their win over Leicester with a 33-21 victory away in Treviso. It wasn’t a convincing display from the four-time Heineken Cup winners, reinforcing the view that Toulouse may struggle  to open up quality sides in the knockout phases of the competition. At half-time Toulouse trailed Treviso 18-9 but three tries in ten minutes midway through the second-half saw them home – though at a heavy price. Captain Thierry Dusautoir is out for several weeks with a knee ligament injury, and hooker Gary Botha, No 8 Louis Picamoles and prop Gurthro Steenkamp also picked up heavy knocks. Toulouse host Ospreys on December 8 before heading to Wales the week after in a pool that remains open. The Ospreys and Leicester are on five points, three behind Toulouse who have failed to collect any bonus points. On the run: Hayman in action for ToulonPool Three: No surprises on Saturday as Biarritz easily overcame Italian side Zebre 38-17 in a match played in appalling conditions. The win broke a run of five consecutive defeats for the Basque club who lie second in the pool, four points behind Harlequins. Next up in the Heineken Cup is a trip to Connacht on December 7, a match Biarritz must win if they’re to have any hope of catching Quins.Pool Four: Castres dented Northampton’s chances of qualifying for the last eight with a 21-16 win over the Saints. According to coach Laurent Travers the victory was a slap down to critics who had damned Castres for sending a weakened team to be thrashed by Ulster the previous week. “This was for those people who said that Castres didn’t deserve to be in the Heineken Cup,” he said. “The players wanted to give their response on the pitch.” They gave their response all right, but which Castres will travel to Glasgow on December 7? Will it be the up-for-it version or the out-of-it version? CARDIFF, WALES – OCTOBER 21: Carl Hayman (C) of Toulon runs at Jamie Roberts (L) of Cardiff Blues during the Heineken Cup Pool Six match between Cardiff Blues and Toulon at Cardiff Arms Park on October 21, 2012 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) last_img read more

  • Six Nations: England 13-10 Ireland

    first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Bea Asprey at Twickenham The match in 30 secondsA crowd of 81,555 saw an evenly-matched England and Ireland battle it out for glory at Twickenham. Just three points were scored in the first-half with Farrell slotting a pen for England, but the lack of points on the scoreboard didn’t reflect the physicality and intensity of the game. Ireland pounced in the 42nd minute as Rob Kearney sliced through the England defence to dot down, but England regained the lead through a scintillating Danny Care score and a watertight defence made sure there was no way back for Joe Schmidt’s men.England – Tries: Care Cons: Farrell Pens: Farrell 2Ireland – Tries: R Kearney Cons: Sexton Pens: Sexton  Click here for match highlightsPost-match bulletin– Stuart Lancaster: “I’m delighted with the win. I thought it was a proper Test match. Ireland are a quality team so it’s just fantastic for the players that the commitment they put into the game was rewarded at the end. Our character and commitment sone through throughout.”Danger man: Man of the Match Mike Brown– Joe Schmidt: “The result showed small margins that exist in Test rugby. We searched long and hard for that last three points in the last ten minutes but credit to England, they defended superbly. Mike Brown’s running in broken field was maybe the difference between the two teams.”– Brian O’Driscoll limped off the pitch in the final minute of the game. Coach Joe Schmidt said the problem was cramp in his calf, and though he will be monitored over the next 48 hours Ireland are expecting him to be available to play against Italy in two weeks time– Tom Wood also suffered from cramp and was replaced in the 70th minute, while Billy Vunipola took a knock to his ankle. The No 8 was replaced at the end of the first half, and will be assessed by the England medics over the next few days England prop Joe Marler (L) tackles Ireland prop Mike Ross (R) during the Six Nations international rugby union match between England and Ireland at Twickenham, west London, on February 22, 2014. AFP PHOTO / GLYN KIRK (Photo credit should read GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images) center_img – England made 430 metres to Ireland’s 351, and Man of the Match Mike Brown made more than other player with 88– Ireland had more possession (59% to England’s 41%) and territory (53% to 47%) than England, and made half as many offloads (5 to England’s 10)– Ireland won 100% of scrums on their own feed, where England won five and lost four, but both teams won 100% of their own lineoutsRock: Ross has Moore snapping at his heelsWhat’s next?– England will draw confidence from a home victory ahead of their match against title holders Wales in two weeks time– Marland Yarde will feature in his first game since November on Sunday for London Irish, and will provide Lancaster with a sought-after selection conundrum on the wing. Yarde has had 12 weeks out injured, but after Jonny May missed an opportunity to score for England early in the first half Lancaster may be tempted to give Yarde a run out against Italy in the final round– David Wilson did well to play for 70 minutes in his first game of 2014, but Dan Cole’s injury has highlighted a lack of depth at tighthead for England– Ireland will be confident of overcoming Italy in Dublin having put in a strong performance, with their set piece holding up well – a welcome change from their last visit to Twickenham in 2012– Ireland are developing good strength in depth in their front row, and Schmidt would do well to start Marty Moore, Sean Cronin and Jack McGrath against Italy in two weeks time– Donnacha Ryan returns for Munster on Sunday and will push Devin Toner for a place in the 23. However the totemic Toner is proving to be a force in the lineout and Schmidt will likely opt for continuity for the rest of the tournamentlast_img read more

  • Jacques Burger: I feel personally responsible to help Namibia rugby grow

    first_img TAGS: Namibia Jacques Burger LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Will MacphersonNamibia go into their first game at the World Cup ranked lower than any other team in the tournament, twentieth.The team is packed full of amateurs and they do not have a big win to hark back to, let alone a World Cup win. Oh, and that first match is against the undisputed heavyweight champions of the world: the All Blacks.How, then, if you are Namibia’s only “name”, one of the very few with big match experience at club level and that crucial knowledge of just how to win, do you get your team-mates up for it?By definition, given their lowly ranking, they go into every game as underdogs, let alone the big one first up against New Zealand. What is the mindset of the World Cup underdog?Welcome to Jacques Burger’s World Cup world.Well, Japan have slightly changed the underdog’s outlook over the last week, according to Burger. “That result does give us hope,” he tells Rugby World.“But it also shows how important a win is. You look at them. They’ve got a box ticked now, they will be a different team. They might lose again but the belief is there and they know they can do it. For us it’s not there yet. One win and we will be a different beast and I believe we can do that at this World Cup.“Our main setback is that mental strength and the belief and knowledge that we can do it. We haven’t had big experience against big sides.“We haven’t had victories against any top sides. We’ve had good victories in the build-up and stuff but we haven’t played teams who are ranked way above us. We need to play more teams like that to get that belief and get that psychological edge to know that we can compete.”Jacques Burger won the Aviva Premiership with Saracens last seasonBurger, who will retire at the end of this season, and is desperate to end his international career with a win at the World Cup, understands the importance of himself as an individual to his green team. Namibia stalwart Jacques Burger believes playing the bigger nations give his country the belief to know they can compete “I think from a mental perspective, being a massive underdog – there’s no pressure on you. You want to do well, and you are nervous,” he continues.“Half our guys are eight-til-five-ers, it’s such a massive honour to be here. So to go out there and do well is the second part of it. For me it’s the first part. That’s why I’m here. I want to win a game at the World Cup.“I need to get them mentally prepared, my job is to lead from the front and use my experience so when it’s tough I can help them dig deep. It’s not about what you say, it’s about how you act and how you work with the guys. Hopefully I can do that.“We now have a set of very experienced and talented guys and a lot more professionals. We have guys who have played big matches, although we don’t yet have the guys who have played big Championship finals. That’s yet to come.“I feel personally responsible to help us in that regard, because I have experience in big losses and have learned from them.“I’ve experienced big victories as well and I know what it takes and how hard you have to push yourself. It’s easy to say these things to the guys, but it’s hard to make them believe it. You can take a horse to water but you can’t make him drink.“The thing about our guys now is that they are incredibly talented, and actually too humble. They’re happy with everything that comes their way, and work really hard and sometimes they don’t know how close the opportunity is to do something great. I hope I can convince them of this.”Even Burger believes that a win in the game against the All Blacks is beyond them, however. That game is about smaller battles, with the experienced to be carried forward into their other three games.“Realistically talking about a win (against New Zealand) is very tough,” he adds. “They are the best team in the world by a mile. I think it’s about small victories: getting some great attacking phases, scoring a good try, breaking the line, keeping them off our line for five minutes when the is pressure on. “These are small things we can learn lessons from. Give us confidence. The scoreline is irrelevant in that game. We will look to do good things and build belief. We have three games after that and I truly believe if we equip ourselves well against the All Blacks, then we can win them. I believe we have the team to surprise everyone. We will be better than people think, I promise you.”Jacques Burger looks after his joints by using FLEXISEQ Sport, the drug-free gel used to relieve joint pain and stiffness and improve overall function. Visit sports.flexiseq.com to be #battlereadylast_img read more

  • Ban? No ban? Ask again later

    first_img “The ball’s out when a bird can sh*t on it”. “The ball’s not out until the scrum-half lifts it off the ground”. “The ball is out as soon as the nine touches it”. Anyone who has even played amateur level rugby is aware of the different interpretations from different referees, and the great news is it’s now spread to citing officers. Not content with taking an all-but-faceless back seat, the citing officers want to add a bit of an ex-citing edge to the game by being consistent in their inconsistency.Scotland play Australia this weekend without two of their best players, after an Australian citing officer decided they had a case to answer for this tackle.No real issue on the Gray side, as he lifts the man and flips him over. Ross Ford, though, surely isn’t doing much wrong. Just ask any New Zealand fan circa 2005 (that’s right, it still hurts!). On a serious note, though, what is the massive difference between that clearout and this one carried out by South Africa’s Francois Louw against Samoa? The decision here? No citing. No card. Nada. I’m not saying they are on the same level, but surely they aren’t miles apart.Then there’s the case of Sean O’Brien. And bear in mind, for the next few seconds at least, that I am Irish, so I could get disowned for this. According to Law 10.4 (f) in the rugby laws, the ban for striking an opponent is two weeks. So why did Sean O’Brien get off with one? Ah, of course, good behaviour. Are there players somewhere who stroll into their hearing, stick two fingers up at the men in suits and light a cigarette? It’s either a two-week minimum or it isn’t.It doesn’t help that the Scottish duo had their ban extended because those higher-ups in rugby wanted to set a good example to younger players. Don’t worry, kids, punching is fine.And a knee to the stomach? Don’t worry about that. Nobody cares. Right, Mr Pocock? Scotland had another incident against Samoa where Ryan Wilson was given a yellow card for firing a kick at a Samoan face – which he just missed thankfully. Yes, he was being held back (as was Sean O’Brien), but that’s an argument for another day. If we’re being consistent here, isn’t Wilson at least worthy of a hearing? Is a kick to the face less damaging than a kidney punch? Is it just roll the dice on any given day and see what length ban we fancy?The problem is the number of different opinions involved. RW’s Sarah Mockford mentioned it in her pool stage summary here, and she has an argument that I agree with. How can citings be “fair” if there are a host of different men overseeing them, each with their own view on what happened, and then a host of different hearings taking place, with each separate group deciding on mitigatingcircumstances, seriousness of incident and – of course – good behaviour.Michael Hooper got a one week ban for a ‘robust’ lead with the shoulder clearout, then Peter O’Mahony got a yellow card and nothing else for doing the same thing against Italy. And never forget Alessana Tuilagi got banned for running with his knees lifted.Me? I’d have the referee take a look at any incidents that the TMO deems necessary, and then the man in the middle decides whether they should be seen by “the head of citing” – who then has the final say on the ban. Give the referee most of the power – as he is the man who was there in the heat of the moment, and knows what the game was like – and then ONE consistent voice to decide on the length of ban.Whatever the answer, something has to change. Here’s the Marcelo Bosch tackle that got him a one week ban, by the way. Just don’t show Sam Warburton. Are World Rugby using Magic 8 Balls to decide on ban lengths? In this wonderful World Cup, all we’re asking for is a bit of consistency… Alafoti Faosiliva is tackled by Finn Russell and Ross Ford during Rugby World Cup Pool B match between Samoa and Scotland. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

  • Analysis: Taulupe Faletau try against New Zealand shows new way for Wales

    first_img Speaking candidly in an excellent interview with European football journalist Graham Hunter in April 2015, Gary Neville admitted that he had “no interest” in examining goals during his role as an analyst for Sky Sports.The former Manchester United defender, England’s assistant manager at Euro 2016, explained he would prefer to rush through even the most spectacular finishes and spend his time dissecting intricate subtleties of any given game.At Eden Park on Saturday, New Zealand and Wales shared seven tries. Warren Gatland’s tourists managed two of them. Both came in the first half but the men in red were eventually enveloped by an All Blacks tide to lose 39-21.In the broader context of the match, Taulupe Faletau’s ninth-minute score carried scant significance. Were Neville in the studio at the final whistle, he would be perfectly entitled to focus on different incidents in order to chart the result.However, Faletau’s try is worth inspecting in closer detail. It epitomised the shift in mind-set underpinning Wales’ excellent, energetic display and demonstrated the following qualities:PatienceDiscipline, co-ordination and cohesionContinuityHandling, distribution and kicking skillsAdaptabilitySound decision-makingTo put it another way, Wales have the tools to implement a more expansive structure and bring out the best in their players – not least Faletau, who is a potent weapon in the 15-metre channel. First, watch the try through:Clearly, the last two phases are slick and incisive. To get a fuller idea of Wales’ collective ambition though, we need to rewind to the previous set-piece.Route one scrumA solid midfield scrum invariably provides an excellent opportunity to test the defence this one is a prime launchpad.Sure enough, Wales spread the field comprehensively. They stack three backs to the right with two on the left and fly-half Dan Biggar directly in behind:Although the scrum partially collapses on the near side, Owen Franks falling inward and Gethin Jenkins hinging……referee Wayne Barnes allows play to continue. Rhys Webbs taps Faletau on the rear and retreats while Kieran Read and Sam Cane lift their heads and Aaron Smith backs away to help defend the right flank:Faletau flicks a left-handed pass to Webb on his right. Meanwhile, Sam Warburton, Read and Cane break off:From here, we see a typical Wales strike move materialise. Webb makes a diagonal run with Jamie Roberts cutting back against the grain. The Harlequins centre is aiming at the space in between New Zealand fly-half Aaron Cruden and Cane.Biggar slides across from his initial position, into the space behind Roberts:In an attempt to punch a hole and generate quick ball, Webb throws a flat (probably forward) pass to Roberts.With the benefit of hindsight, we can say that Webb might have caused more problems by finding Biggar. Cruden is already committed to covering Roberts, disconnected from Ryan Crotty.Biggar would have been presented a three-on-two, Liam Williams and George North with 15 metres of room to the right of Julian Savea, New Zealand’s widest defender:Having said that, Wales adapt to the situation very well. Roberts careers through the tackle of Cruden, losing his balance just over the 10-metre line – a decent gain-line win.Problem-solvingRead swoops to challenge on the floor but Warburton arrives as well with Faletau and Alun-Wyn Jones following up:Warburton and Faletau clear out Read, despite the protestations of Aaron Smith, and Wales have recycled rapidly.Now though, with Webb on the floor after being caught up in a tangle of bodies on feeding Roberts, there is no scrum-half to take advantage by instigating the next phase.Luckily, Alun-Wyn Jones solves the problem. He steps forward……stooping to pick up the ball as Brodie Retallick steps in from the fringe……and sending a flawless 10-metre pass to Biggar:The All Blacks are perennially lauded for the skilful link-play of their tight-five forwards. This clarifies that piano-pushers from the northern hemisphere can tinkle the ivories too.From here, Biggar ships on to Liam Williams amid pressure from New Zealand’s proactive line-speed:Wales no longer have a numerical advantage, so Liam Williams opts to take the ball into contact. Ross Moriarty and North ruck over and Webb can service the breakdown. Ominously though, Retallick sets the defensive line:Having lost some of the initial momentum created by Roberts’ run, Wales look to engender another fast ruck.The most simple way of doing this is by winning a collision, so Alun-Wyn Jones offers himself in a triangular three-man pod, flanked by hooker Ken Owens and fellow lock Bradley Davies.Again, this is sound, clear thinking from Wales. Unfortunately for them, Retallick and Luke Romano – the heavyweight All Blacks second-rows – are in the way:A slip pass to Bradley Davies is covered by Joe Moody. To nit pick, Owens could perhaps demand an inside ball from Alun-Wyn Jones because Jerome Kaino has become slightly disconnected from Retallick.Either way,  Retallick and Romano launch into the 100-cap carrier and drive him backwards:At this point, Kaino fires through in a robust counter-ruck, but Bradley Davies and Owens circle back around the back foot of the breakdown to recycle:Despite losing ground, Wales still have possession. In fact, they calmly go about testing New Zealand in another way.Composure and structurePanning out just prior to the next phase, we can see that Wales have filled the entire field. Out of shot, outside centre Jonathan Davies and Hallam Amos are close to the left touchline.The two key players here are Biggar at first receiver and Roberts, who assumes the role of second receiver and shapes a two-wave structure:With two distributors identifying themselves, surrounding forwards can slot into place. As Webb hits Biggar, Jenkins and Faletau edge up into wave one. They are viable options for Biggar to use.Meanwhile, Warburton steps back into wave two, offering a potential avenue to Roberts:When Biggar catches the ball, Jenkins adopts an unselfish decoy line that fixes Read and Owen Franks in New Zealand’s midfield:Roberts takes and in turn throws a 15-metre pass to Jonathan Davies. The two-wave structure remains in place and the sheer width of the move means New Zealand must employ a passive drift system rather than applying pressure through aggressive line-speed.Malakai Fekitoa combines nicely with Cruden and Waisake Naholo speeds up into the front line from the back-field, where he was covering in case of a kick.This urges Jonathan Davies to straighten rather than bringing in Amos:Roberts and Warburton resource the ruck, while Amos trusts his teammates to recycle and holds his position:Faletau is next on the scene and, though Dane Coles surrenders the breakdown to fill in at guard……the Wales number eight probes close to the ruck and makes a few precious metres.Into the boxNote the tireless support of Gatland’s team, with North arcing across the whole the pitch to offer himself:Amos and Jenkins clear out. Webb circles around and, wisely, decides it is time to go to the air. It is dangerous to be overambitious in the wrong areas, especially against the All Blacks, who punish turnover ball clinically.Webb tells Warburton to latch on to the breakdown as a blocker, while North backs away so he can chase: Wales move on to Wellington for the second Test via a midweek encounter against the Chiefs. Whatever the result of these next three matches, it would be fantastic to see similar verve about the tourists’ attack.Faletau’s try was an ultimately irrelevant snapshot from a match New Zealand won comfortably. But it confirmed that Wales have the ability and athleticism to establish another dimension and move away from clunky, confrontational narrowness. Now, they must show conviction and follow through with this philosophy. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Samson Lee adds another barrier against any charge-down attempts……and Webb gets his box-kick away amid the attentions of Read as Biggar – among the best aerial exponents on the planet – moves forward to chase alongside North.The strike is weighted perfectly. Ben Smith has to come forward, with Biggar able to contest. Four other Welshmen stream forward in close proximity. Pay close attention to Owens, who is circled:Biggar rises to challenge and Ben Smith spills:Hooker Owens is rewarded for his industry as the loose ball falls to him and he gathers wonderfully one-handed……before burrowing on. Once more, the Wales forwards respond. Bradley Davies, Alun-Wyn Jones and Mortiarty join the breakdown……with Bradley Davies cleverly trapping the ball with his foot as he is upended, thus keeping it in the ruck and ensuring that Aaron Smith – on the say-so of Barnes – cannot sneak around the fringes to steal.Because the ball has been won back unexpectedly, Wales are without Webb again. This time, Biggar sprints into the role.Opportunism and an offloadBiggar’s pass from the floor is accurate, finding Roberts at first-receiver. This time, with Savea in the backfield because Ben Smith has just had to deal with Webb’s box-kick, there is a 20-metre channel outside of Crotty:Roberts, perceived to be a blunt battering-ram by some, throws a long, left-handed ball to Jonathan Davies.Look at Faletau (circled in red) at the top of the screen. From this point, he stays still to maintain the width with which Wales can attack on the next phase, much in the same manner that Read does for the All Blacks.Close by, Amos and North are two more protagonists in the eventual try:On the other wing, Liam Williams has space to run into following another crisp pass from Jonathan Davies:The Scarlets man skates through and takes on Savea. Fekitoa and Crotty come across with Jonathan Davies and Roberts in the background:Somehow, Liam Williams stays on his feet. Fekitoa has to make the tackle and Jonathan Davies alters his support line to makes himself available for an offload:Liam Williams frees his right arm, but Crotty is in the way so the full-back holds on:He waits until Crotty has run past him and pops off the floor to his outside centre. This serves two purposes. First, the ball is kept alive and the attack continues. Second, the offload means Fekitoa cannot steal from a resultant breakdown:After Jonathan Davies barrels down the touchline, Roberts clears out Crotty and Webb is back to move the ball away.Ben Smith has covered an immense amount of ground to reach this area of the field, but he is now way out of position:Flourishing finishWales now organise themselves with exceptional speed. The effervescent Alun-Wyn Jones steps up at first-receiver for the second time in this movement. Warburton and Owens flank him… It had no bearing on the end result, but Taulupe Faletau’s try against New Zealand can encourage a tactical shift for Wales. …a reverse angle shows Biggar in behind the Osprey……and Alun-Wyn Jones nears the gain-line to draw Coles and Moody before swivelling……and passing to Biggar. This provides another demonstration of Wales’ multi-layered structure, forwards filling into the framework seamlessly.Owens, in wave one, carries through to obstruct Coles as Lee and Moriarty offer themselves to Biggar in a second wave:But Biggar is looking wider. North (circled), Amos and Bradley Davies have held their depth to form a third wave including Faletau, who is out of shot.In the bottom left corner of this screenshot, Aaron Smith, Ben Smith and Julian Savea – three of New Zealand’s backs – are already struggling to cover across:Indeed, from a different view of Biggar’s pass to North, we can see that all but two of the All Blacks’ backs are close to or within the far 15-metre channel.One of the Kiwis closer to the action is Franks, a tighthead prop. Cane and Cruden are also in a stretched, vulnerable defensive line:Panning out as North shimmies from in to out, fixing Cane, we can see Faletau. He is in the five-metre channel, ensuring Wales can use the full width. Wary, Cruden calls colleagues across:North’s pass to Amos seems to present a three-on-two. However, given Bradley Davies is left behind by his wing’s pace, it is effectively a two-on-two:It matters not. Amos learned some tough defensive lessons opposite Naholo, but gets one over on the tearaway Highlander here.On receiving North’s pass, Amos checks his stride, halting Cruden’s drift……before hitch-kicking away as Cruden momentarily becomes flat-footed:As Bradley Davies cuts back in an attempt to hold the scrambling defenders, Naholo does not trust Cruden to make the tackle and bites in:Faletau, having resisted the urge to gravitate in-field, is two metres from the touchline with open grass in front of him. Amos delivers the right pass……Faletau gathers and slides home past Cane……to score: Finishing touch: Taulupe Faletau dots down after a fine Welsh move last_img read more

  • Convención General Sermón predicado por Presidente Bonnie Anderson

    first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson preached the sermon July 6 at the General Convention’s daily Eucharist. ENS photo/Araceli Ma Cardenas[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] El siguiente sermón fue presentado hoy en la 77a Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal, que se reúne en Indianápolis, Indiana, hasta el 12 de julio.Bonnie Anderson, PresidenteCámara de DiputadosSermón6 de Julio de 2012Convención General – Eucaristía comunitariaEn el nombre del Creador, del Santificador y del Redentor. Amén.Valor.En la colecta que rezamos hace unos minutos recordamos que Dios le dio a Juan Hus el valor para confesar la verdad de Dios y para recordarle a la Iglesia la imagen de Cristo.Hoy somos testigos de un valor increíble. Nuestro antepasado, Juan Hus, que cuestionó públicamente la infalibilidad papal y que también pidió la remoción de un papa hereje. Juan Hus, sacerdote y reformador bohemio, que influyó en el movimiento reformado y que estuvo dispuesto a dar su vida antes que retractarse de su lealtad a la Escritura. Valeroso Juan Hus, quemado en la hoguera mientras cantaba en alta voz “Kirie Eleison”.Valor.C.S. Lewis nos recuerda que el “valor no es simplemente una de las virtudes, sino la forma de todas las virtudes en el momento de la prueba”.El valor anima todas nuestras virtudes: sinceridad, confianza, humildad, compasión, integridad, denuedo. Sin valor, todas estas virtudes quedan latentes. No hay receta para enseñar valor. El curso de Valor 101 no se enseña en la escuela.No obstante, enséñese o no en la escuela, toda nuestra vida es un aprendizaje de valor. Lo aprendemos de nuestros padres, de nuestros amigos, de las personas que nos sirven de arquetipos, como son las de nuestras comunidades cristianas, de figuras públicas que asumen posturas valientes sobre importantes asuntos de derechos humanos. Aprendemos de la sabiduría de teólogos místicos cristianos de los primeros siglos, tales como Evagrio Póntico, para quien nuestra trayectoria espiritual incluye una conversión esencial que nos lleva del temor al valor permanente.Nunca conoceremos a algunas de las personas que nos dan lecciones de valor. Particularmente en esta era tecnológica tenemos la oportunidad sin precedentes de ser testigos del valor en el mundo entero. Incluso hoy, en esta celebración eucarística, la lengua de los montañeses del Sudeste Asiático, destinados al genocidio en el Laos controlado por los comunistas en 1975, fluye a través de nuestros oídos al cantar la melodía de una composición valiente. El pueblo hmong en Vietnam sigue siendo marginado y vive en la pobreza. Todos los días es llamado a mostrarse valeroso. Ello es intrínseco a su espíritu y a su vida diaria.El valor individual surge en nosotros a partir de recuerdos creados por acontecimientos de la vida —acontecimientos que presenciamos en los que alguien que conocemos, amamos o admiramos se muestra valeroso. O en un momento cuando nosotros mismos salimos en defensa de algo que realmente nos importa.Puedo recordar vívidamente la primera vez que salí en defensa de algo. Apuesto que ustedes también pueden. Ese recuerdo se convierte en el relato de un momento definitorio que se incorpora a nuestra identidad y se torna la piedra fundamental de nuestra moralidad o de nuestro valor moral. Si reflexionamos sobre nuestra vida, cada uno de nosotros probablemente pueda contar hoy acerca de sucesos y de personas que ayudaron a conformar nuestro valor moral. El valor moral nos define en nuestro ser más íntimo y nos impulsa a actuar a pesar del temor.Los actos de valor son contagiosos. Nos infundimos valor mutuamente. Al igual que la verdad, reconocemos el valor cuando lo vemos y es difícil ser testigo de un acto valeroso y que no nos inspire valor. El valor es una especie de “reacción en cadena” con su propia dinámica. Partiendo del valor individual, que se inspira en momentos definitorios de nuestra vida, una persona actúa y otros se sienten animados a hacer lo mismo.Cuando no “ejercitamos” nuestro valor —como sucede con un músculo se atrofia por falta de ejercicio— éste se debilita y lentamente se desvanece. Sin usarlo regularmente, resulta más difícil sacar a relucir nuestro valor, está menos a nuestra disposición. Finalmente, si no somos habitualmente valerosos, nuestro valor se seca y se convierte tan sólo en un recuerdo de lo que solía ser.Pero no nos equivoquemos. El ejercitar regularmente nuestro valor, el ser un cristiano valeroso, incluso un episcopal valeroso, tiene un alto precio. Pero aquí tenemos una pequeña ventaja. Contamos con un ADN espiritual y religioso. Nuestro bautismo, que no es un mero ritual para ser miembro de la Iglesia, nos coloca a cada uno de nosotros en un linaje ancestral de personas impetuosas y valerosas; por ejemplo, Juan el Bautista y Jesús. El alto costo del curso es que nuestro bautismo, en las palabras de mi amiga Jeannie Wylie Kellerman, exige “obediencia a la aviesa ética de nuestro Señor basada en la vulnerabilidad y en la ganancia a través de la pérdida”.Luego, pueden ver ustedes, ciertamente, que para seguir a Jesús, para ser sus discípulos, tenemos que ejercitar nuestro valor. Tenemos que aprender valor y enseñar valor a través de nuestras propias acciones valerosas nacidas de un amor y de una fe profundos. Debemos estar en una comunidad cristiana que siempre esté centrada en Jesús. Una comunidad cristiana que sea devota, auténtica y fiel. Cantando en alta voz hasta el día que muramos: “Kyrie Eleison”.Amén. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY General Convention 2012, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET President of the House of Deputies Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Jul 6, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Convención General Sermón predicado por Presidente Bonnie Anderson Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

  • WALES: Review team offers radical vision for church

    first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Anglican Communion News Service] A radical new vision for the future of the Church in Wales is set out in a report launched July 20.Supersize parishes run by teams of vicars and lay people, creative ideas for ensuring churches stay at the heart of their communities and investing further in ministry to young people are among the report’s recommendations following an independent root and branch review.The Church in Wales commissioned the review a year ago to address some of its challenges and to ensure it was fit for purpose as it faced its centenary in 2020. Three experienced people in ministry and church management examined its structures and ministry and heard evidence from public meetings across Wales attended by more than 1,000 people.On the review group were: Lord (Richard) Harries of Pentregarth, former Bishop of Oxford, who chaired it; Charles Handy, former professor of the London Business School; and Patricia Peattie, first chairwoman of the Lothian University Hospitals NHS Trust and former chair of the Episcopal Church in Scotland’s Standing Committee.Their report will now be presented to the Church’s governing body for consideration.It makes 50 recommendations which include:Parishes replaced by much larger ‘ministry areas’ which would mirror the catchment areas of secondary schools, where possible, and be served by a team of clergy and lay people;Creative use of church buildings to enable them to be used by the whole community;Training lay people to play a greater part in church leadership;Investing more in ministry for young people;Developing new forms of worship to reach out to those unfamiliar with church services;Encouraging financial giving to the church through tithing.Archbishop of Wales Barry Morgan welcomed the report. He said, “We are enormously indebted to the Review Group because it has absorbed a great deal of information about us as a church in a short period of time and has made some very perceptive and insightful comments and recommendations. I am also grateful to members of the Church in Wales who in large numbers have enthusiastically engaged with the process. We, as a church, will have to give serious consideration to this report and its recommendations from parish up to province and decide where we go from here.”Harries said, “The Review Team found the Church in Wales to be very warm and welcoming and there are many good things happening. But in order to serve the people of Wales effectively, particularly its young people, we believe some radical re-thinking is necessary.”The full report is online here.The review group held public meetings in all of the six Welsh dioceses — at Cardiff, Abergavenny, Carmarthen, Bangor, St. Asaph and Brecon — between November 2011 and January this year. People were also invited to send in written submissions. Separate meetings were held with senior clergy from each diocese, bishops’ advisers, ordinands and staff from Wales’ theological college, St Michael’s College, Cardiff, and senior staff from the representative body. In March they met a delegation of young people from across the church to hear their views.At the open meetings people were asked what aspect of both their diocese and the church they felt most positive about and what changes they would like to see to make its ministry more effective. They were also asked how they would address challenges such as the predicted fall in clergy numbers and financial resources. Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Rev. Teresa T. Bowden says: WALES: Review team offers radical vision for church An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Posted Jul 20, 2012 Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 21, 2012 at 10:20 pm I am very excited about this new program. We are beginning to work on something similar here n Hawai’i. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (1) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

  • House of Deputies president’s opening remarks to Executive Council

    first_img [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Episcopal Church President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings Oct. 15 presented her opening remarks to the Executive Council at its first meeting of the triennium.The following is the text of her remarks:The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of DeputiesOpening Remarks to Executive CouncilNew Brunswick, New Jersey (Diocese of New Jersey)October 15, 2012Good morning.There’s an old British saying I’ve had in mind these past few months: Start as you mean to go on. And since I was elected in July, that’s what I’ve been trying to do.Now, in case you are aspiring to be the President of the House of Deputies one day, let me warn you about one thing: You don’t get much of a vacation after General Convention. It was a very busy summer of appointing leaders to commissions, committees, agencies and boards (CCABs). The energy and enthusiasm of young leaders that we all witnessed at General Convention resulted in a bumper crop of nearly 750 nominations of clergy and lay people for 142 positions.After months of work and counsel from some wonderful wise people, I announced my appointments to standing commissions and joint standing committees of General Convention and committees of the House of Deputies on October 3. I’m very pleased to tell you that 66 percent of those appointed will be serving on a CCAB for the first time. Twenty-eight percent are people of color. Thirty percent are under age 40, and nearly half—47 percent—are under age 50. The median age of our new CCAB members is 52, which is five years younger than the median age of all Episcopalians in 2010. And I’ve even got a bishop on my council of advice.Start as you mean to go on.Later in this meeting, you will review and confirm or elect the appointments and nominations that the Presiding Bishop and I have made to committees of Executive Council. Those names reflect the same commitment to young, diverse leadership as my earlier round of appointments.Bishop Katharine and I have had the opportunity to meet in New York several times since July, and when she returned from her sabbatical at the beginning of October, we began the stimulating and collaborative process of making our nominations to the structure task force mandated by Resolution C095. We’re not done yet, but we’ve made plenty of progress and even had some fun. Nearly 450 names came to us for the structure task force. I am grateful for the warm welcome and collegiality of the Presiding Bishop and members of her staff during these past few months and for their assistance as I learn the ropes. Thank you, Bishop Katharine.Start as you mean to go on.So the table is nearly set. But the dining room—really, the whole house in which we’ll gather for the meal—looks a whole lot different. As wonderful as I think the people are who have accepted appointments, simply appointing a new crop of leaders to populate old structures won’t do us much good. And as much confidence as I have in the yet-to-be-named structure task force, we can’t sit around waiting for three years for that group to think big thoughts, write a wise report, and save the Episcopal Church.Perhaps you saw last week’s survey from the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life? One-fifth of people in the United States, and one-third of adults under 30, are religiously unaffiliated. And, as the report points out, “With few exceptions…the unaffiliated say they are not looking for a religion that would be right for them. Overwhelmingly, they think that religious organizations are too concerned with money and power, too focused on rules and too involved in politics.”Nothing—no structure task force, no evangelism campaign, no mission initiative—is going to save the Episcopal Church that those of us over age 50 remember from our childhoods. But doing all of those things and more, in new ways, will allow us to create a new Episcopal Church.So we need to start practicing restructuring right now. In our case, as Executive Council members, I think that means we’re called to give up some of our old ways of doing things, give up some of our power to make room for new leaders, and give up some of our entrenched positions to see if we can’t just make practicing restructuring look a lot like practicing resurrection. I think that’s the most important thing I will say today.Start as you mean to go on.We need to start the new triennium’s work by adopting healthy ways of working together. I love top ten lists—you can find my first top ten list for deputies on the House of Deputies website—and here’s my top ten list for Executive Council:10. We’re here to serve the church, not the other way around.9. Be kind. If you wouldn’t say it face-to-face, don’t say it on social media.8. No whining. We are each enormously privileged to be able to serve in this way.7. No triangles. Bishop Katharine and I have pledged to each other that we won’t do that. If you’re unhappy with me, come to me about it. I promise I’ll do the same for you.6. Be leaders. The Church has elected us to serve as leaders.5. Bring your whole and authentic self to serving on Executive Council. As Oscar Wilde said, “Be yourself. Everyone else is taken.”4. Get to know the staff and work with them. They are enormously gifted and want to offer their passion and expertise for the good of the Church.3. If you don’t understand something, ask a question. If something isn’t clear to you, it’s a sure bet it’s not clear to someone else as well.2. Remember that we and the people we serve are the beloved children of God – made in His image, redeemed by His Son, and strengthened by the Holy Spirit.1. And finally, start as you mean to go on.Now, I know we’re straining to get to committees so we can harness all of this new energy and resolve. But I have one piece of business left. We’re ushering in a big group of new leaders in this triennium, but we’re bidding farewell to one leader whose jackets will be impossible to fill. I’d like to close this morning by presenting the first House of Deputies Medal to the Rev. Canon Dr. Gregory S. Straub, who retires as General Convention executive officer on January 1 after nearly eight years and three General Conventions.I first met Gregory in 1998 at a Roman Catholic retreat center in Sierra Madre, California. He was a participant in the third CREDO conference for clergy and I was a faculty member. We became fast friends and have remained so to this day.For many years, Gregory has served the Episcopal Church with distinction, common sense, good humor, and steadfast devotion. He was a consummate parish priest serving Emmanuel Church in Chestertown, Maryland for 30 years, and when he sought my counsel about the position of executive officer, I told him he was born for that job. He served as the secretary of the Convention of the Diocese of Easton for 23 years as well as secretary of numerous boards and organizations. He is precise, he is attentive to detail, and he goes about his work in such a way that order is born out of chaos. He keeps track.Some people might say that Gregory’s sense of sartorial splendor is his most unique gift to the Church. Certainly there are a number of Gregory wannabes as you can see from one of the pictures. Just a few days ago, in fact, I heard of a young man of 13 who is attending a dance. He asked to go shopping for a bow tie. You see, he had witnessed classic taste and grace in the person of Gregory at General Convention, and he knew exactly what sense of style he wished to emulate.But if you think Gregory’s sartorial splendor is his greatest gift, you would be wrong. Gregory’s greatest gifts are these: his love of the Episcopal Church, his integrity and strength of character, his ability to size up situations and people and make good decisions, his devotion to friends and colleagues, his perceptive mind and deep appreciation of history and tradition, his wickedly dry sense of humor, not to mention his ability to travel the world by rail, sea and air (in that order of preference) and find something fascinating about each place he visits.For all of these reasons, in recognition of his distinguished service to the House of Deputies and the Episcopal Church he loves so dearly, and with gratitude for his friendship, wisdom, and counsel, I am pleased to award the inaugural House of Deputies Medal to Gregory Straub. Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release House of Deputies president’s opening remarks to Executive Council Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL President of the House of Deputies In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 15, 2012 at 1:29 pm Thank you changing the tone in making your “start”.Thank you for the gracious thank you to Gregory Straub, that represents the sentiments of the HOD so well. Executive Council, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (1) Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Suzanne Foucault says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Oct 15, 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Executive Council October 2012, Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

  • Sandy reflections: ‘Held in the bonds of love by the…

    first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Hurricane Sandy Rector Washington, DC The outsides of many abandoned homes, such as this one in Little Egg Harbor, do not look as if they were damaged by Sandy. However, flooding has wrecked their interiors. Photo: Church of the Holy SpiritEditors’ note: A year ago today, Oct. 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy set to reeling a large part of the East Coast of the United States. At least 147 people died in the Atlantic basin because of the storm; of that number 72 were killed in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States. Sandy caused an estimated $65.7 billion in damage, including destroying or damaging 650,000 homes and damaging hundreds of thousands of businesses. Episcopal News Service invited seven people to reflect on their experience of Sandy, what lessons they and their faith communities learned and what challenges they still face. All seven reflections are available here.[Episcopal News Service] People and places all along the Eastern seaboard were “like fish taken in a cruel net” (Ecclesiastes 9.12). In Tuckerton/Little Egg Harbor, our list of impacted families totaled one-third of our average Sunday attendance. Southern Ocean County, New Jersey had whole neighborhoods which were washed away. In the first days, we connected mostly with each other, providing reassurance that no one was alone and all were safe. Yet, in the face of that devastation and darkness, we quickly noticed another more positive net holding us tightly. We were held together, then and now, by “the kingdom of heaven (which) is like a net that was thrown into the sea” (Matthew 13.47).People we knew; our bishop, clergy and parishes away from the storm, friends and family reached us immediately. Just as quickly, strangers, most bearing the name Christian, arrived in droves to help; others sent cash or things for our use. We were noticeably held in the bonds of love by the people of Jesus. We learned that existing relationships among the clergy and lay people from various churches formed a strong base for emergency response and long term recovery activity.The Rev. Martha McKee is vicar of Church of the Holy Spirit in Tuckerton, New Jersey.We saw that we could share the work: One church hosted visiting recovery teams and another took lunch out each day to the streets. Our church specialized in food; quickly reopening the food pantries and supplying food for workers. Congregations near and far supported our efforts, blurring denominational lines. We coordinated with the rector of the Church of the Holy Innocents’, Beach Haven to provide a place for that congregation to worship and plan. We saw that none of us, individually or as congregations, worked alone. We were part of a network created by Christ and worked out among his people.Our area will be permanently changed by Superstorm Sandy. Many neighborhoods are largely vacant, increasingly plagued by crime. Families of renters have left the area, decreasing our school populations. Many elderly people were financially ruined by the loss of their home, which was their major asset. Stored possessions are being lost and damaged as time goes on.Our experience of the kingdom bonds that hold God’s people together now informs the ministries of our congregation and other churches here. Long-term recovery/housing restoration in our area is being led by the Lighthouse Alliance Community Church. We are working together to see that the storm survivors in our area are able to live in their homes again. Substantial funding has flowed through the local ministerium from our diocese and Episcopal Relief& Development, the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Program, Robin Hood Foundation and other sources.Our annual CROP Walk was moved to October 27 with an intention to recognize the help we received this year. Through this walk, the Soles for the Harvest MGD event, and other actions; we are beginning to give back some of the care and money that was shared with us.Five Episcopal churches in the Long Beach Island area have begun meeting to develop stronger support of one another. The next disaster will find us more closely connected to one another.Our awareness of our kingdom connections is the greatest blessing of the past year. Mindful of the net of love that connects us, we are looking to improve our abilities to do the duty of all Christians: “….to follow Christ; …worship …work, pray and give for the spread of the kingdom of God” (Book of Common Prayer).— The Rev. Martha McKee is vicar of Church of the Holy Spirit in Tuckerton, New Jersey. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Sandy reflections: ‘Held in the bonds of love by the people of Jesus’ By Martha McKeePosted Oct 29, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more