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  • COLEMAN STARS AT OLD TRAFFORD, BUT EX-DERRY STAR SINKS SHAY

    first_imgSEAMUS Coleman played a starring role as Everton beat Man United at Old Trafford last night.The Killybegs footballer helped launch wave after wave of attack on a United side rapidly losing its gloss.Coleman paid tribute to new Everton boss Roberto Martinez afterwards as the blues secured their first victory at Old Trafford in 21 years. Brian Oviedo scored four minutes from time to give Everton the win.“It’s been too long really and the manager has been working hard to get us to believe we could come here and get a result,” he said.“It came on the way we’ve been playing, the way we’ve been keeping the ball and the confidence that has built. He just wanted us to play with no fear.“Earlier in the season we tried to go to City in the same way but since then the manager has had more time to instil belief in us and we’re delighted with the result. “From the sidelines all we could hear was the manager telling us to keep getting on the ball, and that was when we were 1-0 up.“We got a brilliant result against Stoke and worked hard in training on how to beat United. Thankfully we did.”He said Everton can do well this season.“Without a doubt it makes us think the top four is possible,” he said. “Coming to places like this and getting a result the way we’re playing makes us think we can finish high up the table.“This will only give us more confidence. We know we’ve to Arsenal next and they’re top but we’re looking forward to it, just like we were looking forward to this. We’ve got some good points from some tough games.” Coleman also saluted fellow full-back Bryan Oviedo for his goal.“He’s done fantastically,” he added. “It’s a blow to be missing Leighton because he’s one of the best there is but we’re happy for Bryan. He’s such a likeable character and as you see when he scores we all have a lot of time for him.“He’s waited a long time for his chance and he deserves it. It was going to have to be an injury because of the way Bainesy plays but he’s taken his chance. I’m sure he’s delighted.”Meanwhile Shay Given was unlucky not to have helped his new side Middlesbrough to a point at Derby. Despite being down to 10 men for most of the game Boro looked as if they were heading for a 1-1 draw with the Rams.But in the 90th minute former Derry City striker Connor Sammon popped up to give Derby all three points.COLEMAN STARS AT OLD TRAFFORD, BUT EX-DERRY STAR SINKS SHAY was last modified: December 5th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:evertonseamus colemanlast_img read more

  • Takeaways: A’s rising to occasion in crucial stretch

    first_imgOAKLAND — It would be an understatement to say the A’s have struggled to finish games off against the Houston Astros this season.Before this series at the Coliseum began, the A’s had gone 2-5 vs. the Astros in 2019 in games decided by two runs or less. Overall, Oakland had just two wins in 11 games against the two-time defending American League West champions..Times have changed, as the A’s picked up their second straight one-run victory over Houston, this one courtesy of Robbie Grossman’s …last_img read more

  • Inefficient Hot Water Piping Layouts Waste Hot Water

    first_imgThe proposal would set requirements resulting in small volumes of hot water in the pipes between the hot water source and the use. It is intended to apply to all occupancies, although in the article I am focusing on residential applications.The ICC is holding Final Action Hearings on October 22-28, 2012 in Portland, Oregon. The proposed amendments to the International Plumbing Code (IPC) will be heard on Wednesday, October 24th, starting at 1:00 pm.Among the key provisions in the proposed change are:a requirement that 3/8-inch pipe should only be used for fixture fittings that have a flow rate that does not exceed 1.5 gallons per minute;a requirement (for some residential applications) that the maximum volume of water in the pipe between the water heater and a tap shall be 64 ounces;a requirement (for some residential applications) that the maximum length of piping between a water heater and a tap be restricted to 50 feet for 3/8-tubing, 43 feet for 1/2-inch tubing, and 21 feet for 3/4-inch tubing.To understand how these provisions would be implemented, it is essential to read the code proposal in its entirely. (See the link provided below.) The “reasons statement” accompanying the proposed code changeAs an I-code, the IPC specifies minimally acceptable requirements for plumbing. Delivery of hot water to a user in a timely manner is one measure of plumbing performance. The American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) specifies the delivery of hot water to the user in 10 seconds or less as “acceptable performance,” delivery of hot water to the user in 30 seconds or less as “marginal performance,” and delivery of hot water in more than 30 seconds as “unacceptable performance”. Implementing this proposal will improve health and safety by correlating the IPC with local health codes and with good plumbing engineering and plumbing practice. It will also result in satisfied users, including those in areas with low water pressure.The core of this proposal is to make sure the volume of water in the pipes, which must be cleared out before hot water can be delivered, does not prevent the delivery of hot water in a timely manner. If you agree that delivery of hot water should be at least “marginally acceptable” in terms of time-to-tap, then you need to support this proposal.Supporting InformationThe following documents the values in this proposal and demonstrates the response to the committee’s comments. The committee [previously] disapproved P130 because the “volume limitations were too restrictive and unrealistic to apply to all buildings.” In response, this comment increases the lengths for smaller diameter branches from circulation loops or heat-traced lines. It also improves the readability of the code text.Why implementing the 2012 IPC often results in “Unacceptable Performance”The 2012 IPC allows for 50 feet of developed length [of piping] – of any diameter – from the source of hot or tempered water to the fixtures. However, the delivery of hot water is a question of volume (length and diameter) between the source and the uses and flow rate of the use. At current legal flow rates for faucets, showers and many appliances, 50 feet of piping contains more water than can be cleared out in the Marginally Acceptable time of 30 seconds or less, let alone the Acceptable Performance time of 10 seconds or less.We are all familiar with the problem of waiting for hot water to arrive. When it takes too long at hand-washing sinks, many of us just give up and use whatever temperature comes out. When it takes too long at a shower, we watch the water run down the drain until the water is hot enough to use. When it takes too long in public restrooms or at hand washing sinks in food service establishments, it becomes a concern for our public health code colleagues.Providing hot or tempered water to public lavatory faucets is a special case, and the reason we have called it out in this proposal. The time-to-tap is particularly important for hand washing events, which tend to be of very short duration, generally 5-10 seconds long. Large volume in the fixture supply piping, low flow rates and short events result in it taking a very long time for the water to get warm. Correcting this requires keeping the volume small enough so that hot water arrives in a timely fashion when only one faucet with a maximum fixture fitting flow rate of 0.5 gpm or a maximum volume per cycle of 0.25 gallons is being used. Having even Marginally Acceptable performance requires piping lengths much less than 50 feet long.Can a volume limit be applied to all buildings?Yes. The specifics have to do with the configuration of the hot water system within the building. There are three typical configurations for a hot water system: a central water heater (or boiler) with trunks and branches serving each use or group of uses; a central water heater (or boiler) with a circulation loop or heat traced trunk line and branches to each use; distributed water heaters (or boilers) located close to the uses they serve. Buildings can have one or a combination of these systems as long as the 2012 IPC requirement of no more than 50 feet of developed length on any path from the source to the use is met.The volume limitations in this proposal work in any building. Buildings with vertical risers will be able to comply by locating the fixture fittings and appliances close to a circulated riser; this should not be a problem as they are relatively close already. Buildings with a central corridor circulation loop will be able to comply by locating the hot water fixture fittings and appliances closer to the corridor or by moving the loop closer to the fixture fittings and appliances. Buildings with public lavatories can meet the volume and length limits in this proposal in several ways including bringing circulation loops closer to the faucets, priming the branch lines that run behind the wall when people enter the lavatory, heat tracing the branch lines or installing water heaters in the bathroom or under the sinks.In some buildings, no changes to architectural design will be needed – it will only be necessary to design and install the plumbing to meet the new code. In other buildings changes in the architectural design will be needed so that the hot water system will meet the new code. It is likely that we will see more buildings with combinations of hot water delivery systems. Based on my experience with improving the performance of hot water systems throughout the US, costs for additional water heaters or for somewhat longer circulation loops and heat traced trunk lines will be more than offset by the savings in smaller diameter trunk lines and in shorter branches that are often of smaller diameter because their length is smaller too.What should be the maximum allowable volume?Implementing the IPC should result in at least marginally acceptable performance at legal flow rates, in all occupancies, even in areas with low water pressure. The American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) has established performance criteria for the timely delivery of hot or tempered water (Domestic Water Heating Design Manual – 2nd Edition, ASPE, 2003, page 234). Table 1 [reproduced below as Image #2], taken from text in ASPE’s manual, presents the time-to-tap performance criteria. According to this table, 30 seconds is the maximum amount of time to have Marginal Performance. Anything longer is unacceptable.So how much water is contained the IPC allowable limit of 50 feet of developed pipe length? Will clearing out this volume of water result in at least marginally acceptable performance? Table 2 [reproduced below as Image #3] shows the volume contained in 50 feet of pipe for nominal diameters up to 4 inches. (I realize that 50 feet of developed length is almost always shorter than 50 feet of pipe, but for simplicity, I have used 50 feet in the table.)Let’s look at a few examples: 50 feet of ¾ inch tubing contains 1.2 gallons, 50 feet of 1 inch contains just under 2 gallons, 50 feet of 2 inch contains 7 gallons and 50 feet of 4 inch contains more than 28 gallons. This is the minimum volume that must be cleared out of the pipe before hot water will get from the source to the use. (Based on research conducted by the California Energy Commission, the actual volume that will come out before hot water arrives is more than volume contained in the pipe. In ¾ inch nominal pipe, approximately 25 percent more water will come out at 2 gpm; 50 percent more will come out at 1 gpm and 100 percent more will come out at 0.5 gpm. The amount of additional water that comes out gets larger as the pipe diameter increases.)Table 2 [Image #3 below] also shows the consequences of the volume in terms of the time-to-tap for flow rates of 2, 1 and 0.5 gpm. This range of flow rates is typical of showers, sinks and public lavatory faucets. Near the top of the table, the minimum time to clear out the cold water in the pipe is shown in seconds, further down it is shown in minutes. (NA is shown when we considered the flow rate to be excessive for the pipe diameter – either too much pressure drop or excessive velocity, or both – based on an analysis using the Hazen-Williams formula.)None of the times shown in Table 2 are within the Acceptable Performance range. This means that if plumbers or plumbing engineers design a hot water system to meet the minimum 2012 IPC, without also paying attention to the volume in the piping it will most often result in Unacceptable Performance. The best they can get is Marginal Performance in a limited number of cases. Table 3 [reproduced below as Image #4] compares the time-to-tap performance different volumes that are being discussed at this Final Action Hearing. The flow rates in the table are typical of faucets and showerheads, and many appliances such as dishwashers and washing machines.Using ASPE’s criteria, only 3 data points in Table 3 have Acceptable Performance; 9 have Marginal Performance; all the rest have Unacceptable Performance. None of the volumes have Acceptable Performance for the low flow rates (0.5 gpm and smaller) found in public lavatory faucets. In addition, the Performance times shown in the 0.25 and 0.5 gpm columns are longer than the actual event itself, which is often only 5-10 seconds long. To make any sense at all, hot water must reach the faucet before the event is over, which is why there is a separate volume requirement in this proposal for the fixture fittings with these flow rates that are found in public lavatories.We need to assess the performance when flow rates are between 1 and 1.5 gpm, not the maximum values of 2.2 and 2.5 gpm allowed by code for faucets and showers respectively. Why? One reason is that the flow rates of faucets and showers are rated at pressures of 60 and 80 psi respectively. In practice, operating pressures are often less than the rated pressure and the actual flow rate is less than the rated flow rate. In addition, hot water is only a portion of the total flow rate. The reduction in flow rate is most noticeable in areas with low water pressure to begin with. Another reason is that studies done in Indiana, California and Minnesota have found that even when full flow rate faucets and showers had been installed, the hot water portion of the flow was most often between 1 and 1.5 gpm. In this range of flow rates, the 300-ounce volume has Unacceptable Performance. The 75-ounce volume has both Unacceptable and Marginal Performance. The 64-ounce volume has Marginal Performance. The 24-ounce volume has both Marginal and Acceptable Performance. I believe the IPC should provide at least marginally acceptable performance at typical flow rates for all areas in the jurisdiction, including those with low pressure.This section only applies to Public Lavatory FaucetsThe time-to-tap is particularly important for hand washing events in public lavatories, which tend to be of very short duration. It becomes essential to keep the volume from the source to the use very small when the fixture fitting flow rate is only 0.5 gpm. Looking at the row for ½ inch nominal tubing in Table 2, the minimum time to clear out the cold water would be 1.2 minutes. Assuming that each hot water draw lasts 5 seconds, and that all draws happen right after each other, the 15th user would get hot water. If the branch line were larger, say ¾ inch, the minimum time increases to 2.3 minutes and the 28th user would get hot water. If the branch line was 1 inch, the minimum time increases to 3.9 minutes and the 47th user would get hot water.The delivery of hot water to public lavatory faucets needs to be considered separately because of potential health issues. The events are short and the flow rates are low. Table 4 [reproduced below as Image #5] shows the time-to-tap performance based on the requirements in the proposal. The 0.25 and 0.5 gpm columns show that even at very low flow rates this volume will result in Acceptable Performance according to ASPE criteria. Given the short amount of time people spend washing their hands in public restrooms, it does not make sense to Marginal Performance category for determining the volume from the source to the use for public lavatory faucets. The volume was chosen so that hot water would arrive in the first part of the hot water event so that every person who uses the public lavatory will have the benefits of hot water.Now to the decisionThe provisions in the 2012 IPC (and previous versions), which only limit the feet, do not give guidance on the volume and as we have shown, often as not result in Unacceptable Performance. Unfortunately, many of us have experienced this! In contrast, this proposal contains the provisions necessary to support the correlation of the plumbing and health codes with good plumbing engineering design and plumbing installation practice.There are 3 key questions that we are asking you to answer:1. Do you want the IPC to support the provisions in local health codes to supply hot or tempered water for hand washing for every user of public lavatory faucets?2. Do you want the IPC to support the ability of plumbers and plumbing engineers to provide hot water within 30 seconds after opening the tap; this is the Acceptable and Marginal Performance ranges as defined the American Society of Plumbing Engineers. (See the arrows next to Tables 3 and 4.)3. Do you want the IPC to provide these levels of performance in all parts of your jurisdiction, including those with low water pressure?If so, please support this comment. Assembling the required votesTo get this proposal adopted, we need to have enough code officials who support the measure to attend the hearing and vote for it. We need a two-thirds majority to prevail. So please talk with your local code officials and ask them to support it. If they are not able to travel to Portland, ask them to get you in touch with those from your state who are going to attend. If that is not possible, please ask them to send a short letter of support that can be read into the record.If you are able to attend the meeting in Portland, short statements providing reasons why this proposal is worthy of a “yes” vote are in order. We need perspectives from the point of view of architects, plumbing engineers, builders and plumbers. I am willing to help you craft your testimony so that is most effective for this audience. What is the key to an efficient piping layout for domestic hot water? The answer is to keep the volume of hot water between the water heater and the tap as small as possible. The difficulty is that most buildings have only one source of hot water and the many uses are spread throughout the floor plan.The least expensive answer for new buildings would be to group all of the bathrooms near the kitchen, so that the home has one or more plumbing cores. That way, that hot and cold water uses would all be located close together, near the water heater or boiler that served them. In houses, this would typically mean one or two such cores.In the absence of such cores, we need to plan the plumbing to supply hot water as efficiently as possible. Those of you who know my work have heard about Structured Plumbing. (For more information on Structured Plumbing, see Saving Water and Energy in Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems and Guidelines for Specifying Structured Plumbing Systems.)Structured Plumbing is a method of running the trunk line of the hot water distribution system from the water heater past the hot water uses so that the volume from the trunk to each use is as small as practical, ideally less than 1 cup. In addition to routing the hot water supply close to each use, the Structured Plumbing approach includes a demand-initiated pump that allows the occupants to prime the trunk line shortly before they want hot water.Green Building Advisor has had several articles on topic of efficient hot water supply over the years; see, for example, Hot-Water Circulation and Waiting for Hot Water. Proposed code changesNow to the proposal itself: P130-12 (AMPC)-Klein is the most important of the proposals I have submitted. The proposal can be viewed on the ICC website. (To navigate through the document, click on the “P130” link in the sidebar that appears on the left side of the screen.)Three other proposals — P89, P92 and P129 — concern recirculation pumps and pump controls for domestic hot water systems and are also worthy of your consideration. They can be found in the International Plumbing Code section on the ICC website linked to above. A proposed amendment to the plumbing codeCurrent building codes permit builders to install piping systems that waste too much hot water. I’m now drumming up support for a proposed amendment to the International Plumbing Code. RELATED ARTICLES GBA Encyclopedia: Hot-Water CirculationGBA Encyclopedia: Efficient supply layoutsGetting Into Hot Water — Part 3All About Water HeatersGetting In Hot WaterWaiting for Hot WaterProduct Guide: Taco Hot Water D’Mand System Gary Klein: Residential Hot Water Distribution Gary Klein is the managing partner of Affiliated International Management. His firm provides consulting on sustainability, primarily on the water-energy-carbon connection.last_img read more

  • Austin Hays on Mike Gundy Dancing: ‘I Didn’t Know You Could Do That’

    first_imgChandler Vessels (a PFB contributor) did a great piece for the O’Colly on who would win a dance-off between Baker Mayfield and Mike Gundy. Some of the answers to his questions are absolutely spectacular.Consider this from Austin Hays on his favorite Mike Gundy dance move.“When he just drops it. You’d think he wouldn’t be able to because you never really see him do anything like that, and then all of a sudden, he just drops it to the floor, and you’re like, ‘Oh, wow, coach, I didn’t know you could do that.’”That is the best.AdChoices广告One of my other favorites is from Emmanuel Ogbah.“His dances moves are one of a kind. You never know what to expect. Even though he does the same moves every time, you still don’t expect it, but you do expect it. It’s kind of weird.”Strangely, I know exactly what Oghab is saying.Anyway, you should go read the whole piece. It’s a great idea and it’s well executed. Also, I am all in favor of a Mayfield-Gundy dance-off at midfield on Saturday. “I’m going to have to say the head man, Coach Gundy,” Jordan Sterns told the O’Colly when asked who would win this hypothetical dance-off. “I don’t know how he does some of the things he does. He gets low and all that other stuff. They should have a dance contest after the game. We’ll see who wins.” While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

  • Which Big 12 Teams Are Most Efficient in the Red Zone?

    first_imgRecently we looked at how effective Oklahoma State has been on red-zone trips this year. I am using a stat I call PPR or “points per red-zone attempt”.The stat basically shows how good a team is at getting touchdowns (six points) instead of settling for field goals (three points) once they get into the red-zone.I thought it would be helpful to go a little more in-depth on the stat and in the spirit of context, compare the Cowboys to the rest of the Big 12. Here I compared this year’s Cowboys to previous OSU teams.Here are the current PPR rankings for the Big 12.b12pprIowa State is higher than I would have thought and Baylor and West Virginia are lower. Of course this is only part of the equation. We need to look at how many times each team gets to the red zone in order to use that effectiveness.Here are the red-zone attempts per game.b12rzaSo, while Iowa State is third in red-zone points per attempt, they make it to the red zone less than three times per game, better than only Kansas. Baylor hasn’t been the most efficient as far as touchdowns to field goals inside the 20-yard line, but they get there over five times per game, meaning more points.The Cowboys went a perfect three-for-three in the red zone last week against Kansas State and didn’t attempt a single field goal. They’ll need to continue that uptick in efficiency if they want to keep up with the remaining three offenses on their schedule.Check out my look at PPR numbers as they pertain to a grading Big 12 defenses. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

  • What Oklahoma State is getting in Trey Sterling: His take

    first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Oklahoma State landed a commitment from a dynamic athlete, Trey Sterling, earlier this week. The Cowboys plucked Sterling out of Sunnyvale High School, just outside the Dallas area, and PFB caught up with him to talk about his recent decision to play for the Cowboys.Q: Walk me through the recruitment process for you — when did OSU offer, and what was your decision process like that helped you land on the Cowboys?A: The offer came a couple of days ago. But before the offer I had been talking to the coaches quite often and that helped with the decision, along with the coaches showing they cared about me actually wanted me and not just sending stuff they send to hundreds of players across the country. After the offer me and my family talked about the pros and cons of OSU and there was only one negative and it had nothing to do with my academic or athletic lifestyle. I’m into all of the tradition at OSU, it’s so rare I would be stupid not to commit as early as I did.Q: What position are they looking to slip you into at OSU, and what type of player is OSU getting in Trey Sterling?A: OSU is getting a player who is still discovering his potential. I’m a very physical safety who isn’t shy to come down hill and hit someone! My coverage is just as good but most people don’t see that because my physicality is what stands out.Oklahoma State’s getting a tough, physical safety made in the form of Jordan Sterns — he has good range and coverage, and isn’t afraid to lay down the truck-stick on the back end. He’s played multiple positions in high school, including running back which only adds to the intrigue of Sterling as an athlete with some high upside. Check out highlights from the early part of his senior season.last_img read more

  • Joe Mixon: ‘It Felt Like a Dude Hit Me’

    first_imgThe Oklahoman got a copy of the police report from the Joe Mixon-Mia Molitor fight from 2014, and I’m not real sure I believe what Joe Mixon had to say here.“And after that, like, I was so shocked, because she hit me so hard,” said Mixon. “It felt like a dude hit me. And after that, like, my face went boom, my reaction was just right there.”So yeah. I just don’t see how this feels like a dude hit you. I know you’re sort of caught up in the moment or whatever, and I am one of those people who loathes getting touched in the face/neck.But the self-defense card Mixon and his lawyers have been playing for the past two years got burned up when the video came out. They act like he was getting cornered by someone who looked like Shawn Willis and not open-hand slapped by a petite college student.Mixon also noted that he was called a racial slur by the woman’s gay friend even though later he noted that the slur was not said to him but about him. The whole thing is a complete mess, and I hate that it ever happened.Here is Joe Mixon punching a woman. Hope it was worth the Ws, OU. https://t.co/snveBtubg1 pic.twitter.com/Sarv9FKdnQ— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) December 16, 2016There are 2017 implications, too. I think Mixon is more likely to return to Norman now that this is out. I think he needs as much space from the video as possible before the NFL Draft.Here’s draft expert Tony Pauline of Draft Analyst.Since the release of the video, general managers around the league have told those close to Mixon he won’t get drafted, there’s a possibility he won’t be signed as a free agent and he may not even receive an invitation to the combine should he declare for the draft.That’s a stunner. So not only do we have to live with the fact that Mike Gundy did the right thing (with Tyreek) and Bob Stoops did not, but now we might have to live with another year of Mixon’s Bedlam destruction. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

  • Three Stats For The Alamo Bowl: Who Gets Explosive Plays?

    first_imgColorado1.15 per game0.85 per game + 0.54 per game       (24th in FBS) Opportunities are going to be important in a game where a strong secondary could limit a high flying offense and an offense dependent on an injury prone quarterback running the ball effectively.With two ball-hawking defenses, momentum will hang in the balance at times and if the Pokes can win this battle, they’ve won 28 out of the last 30 games that they haven’t lost a turnover.Who Gets Explosive Plays?A good indicator of how smoothly an offense functions is explosive plays (over ten yards), as the likelihood of going 70 yards is awful difficult without those kinds of plays. And the Pokes have done a really good job of that, averaging more than 18 plays of 10+ yards per game (no. 17 in FBS). The steady Buffalo attack is middle of the road averaging just below 14.5 plays of 10+ yards per game.  A big reason for OSU’s advantage is a guy who can do stuff like this:So how good are the Alamo opponents at stringing together long drives? The Pokes are No. 3 in the country at getting points on drives of 80+ yards while the Buffs stall out far more often earning them 94th in the FBS in points per long drive. Just watching their highlights, you can see most good things for them aren’t longer plays but shorter stuff:The Colorado offense has been capable, putting up 446 yards per game. But if Zach Sinor gets to pinning the Buffs deep in their own territory, don’t count on CU quarterback Sefo Liufau to lead them on a long, fruitful drive like we’ve grown accustomed to in Boone Pickens Stadium… And will get to enjoy next year! InterceptionsFumblesTurnover Margin The Pokes do a better job of holding on to the ball (*crosses his fingers that Neutral Site Mason is more like Home Mason than Road Mason*) and I think that’s ultimately what gives OSU the edge here. The Buffs have a lauded secondary and Coach Gundy talked about how six of their guys are being looked at by the NFL, but that doesn’t intimidate the Cowboy offense.A couple of years ago the Pokes went toe-to-toe with a prolific defense featuring numerous future NFL guys in the Cactus Bowl against Washington, but how this strength-vs-strength match up turns out will no doubt be shaping in the outcome. The Cowboy secondary isn’t too bad itself: OSU1.08 per game0.92 per game + 0.83 per game        (11th in FBS) The Pac-12 South Champs are a different type of team than the Pokes have seen in 2016, let’s take a look at some key numbers that are likely to shape the outcome.Keep the Buffs below 100 Yards RushingThe most apparent common denominator in all three of Colorado’s losses is not being able to top 100 yards rushing. Otherwise stated, Colorado is undefeated when they rush for 100+ yards and slowing the ground game severely stunts the offense. The Pokes are giving up an average of 204 yards per game in their “bend don’t break” scheme facing potent Big 12 offenses and it’ll be intriguing to see how the Cowboys fare against a less potent Pac-12 unit.Coach Gundy is 32-5 when OSU holds teams below 100 yards and he’ll need guys like Chad Whitener, Mote Maile and DQ Osborne to step up and do a solid job stuffing the run up the middle. If Glenn Spencer’s front seven can keep the Buffs rushing attack at bay, the Cowboys will have a great shot at getting to that magical 10th win. Especially when you’ve got a guy who can hit like this:https://twitter.com/SajanP97/status/805129822800379904Top 25 Turnover Margin BattleThe Pokes are one of the best in the nation at turning teams over (it’s so fun that we can repeat that phrase about our basketball team!), but tonight will feature two teams that are great at it (both averaging two per game). While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Forcing Turnovers #Big12FB: The week nine #TopPlays winning play is Ramon Richards’ interception in OSU’s win over West Virginia. https://t.co/XuCLbxX3DP— Big 12 Conference (@Big12Conference) November 3, 2016OSU has one of the nation’s best throwing the ball around as Mason Rudolph has only thrown four interceptions on 416 attempts this year (an interception every 104 throws). The Buffs QB is twice as likely to throw a pick as he has six interceptions on 290 attempts (an interceptions every 48 throws).With a peaking run game (6.43 yards per carry since November 1st), the Buffs will have to fill up the box to slow down a freshman All-American and a steamroller named Chris Carson. Advantage: Cowboys.last_img read more

  • Oklahoma State Commit Spencer Sanders Ranked as Top QB in Texas by ESPN

    first_img9. Matt CorralUSC 5. Adrian MartinezCal 2. Justin FieldsPenn State 10. Justin RogersNot committed 3. Jacob SirmonWashington 4. Emory JonesOhio State 11. Colson YankoffWashington ProspectCommitted In the first release of the 2018 ESPN300 rankings released this week, quarterback Spencer Sanders, the top rated recruit in OSU’s 2018 class, earned respect as not only one of the best quarterbacks in the country, but the No. 1 ranked quarterback in the talent rich state of Texas — even after tearing his ACL during his junior season.Here’s a look at where he ranks among quarterbacks nationally, according to the latest ESPN rankings. 12. Artur SitkowskiMiamicenter_img 13. James FosterMissouri 6. Tanner McKeeNot committed 8. Jack WestStanford 1. Trevor LawrenceClemson 7. Dorian Thompson-RobinsonNot committed 14. Spencer SandersOSU Sanders is ranked as the 108th prospect nationally out of Denton Ryan High School and the 14th best in the entire state of Texas. He amassed 3,288 passing yards and 53 total touchdowns in his junior season in 15 games of action.Also in ESPN’s latest rankings system is Hunter Anthony, OSU’s offensive line commit who pledged last month, who graded as a high three-star recruit and the No. 9 player in the state of Oklahoma. New verbal commitment and offensive tackle prospect Bryce Bray of Bixby is ranked as the No. 7 prospect in the state. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

  • A Look Where Big 12 Attendance Fits Nationally

    first_imgSun Belt3.295.62 TeamAverage Texas97,881 Oklahoma86,857 Pac-12 (10)-3.48-11.08 TCU45,168 SEC-1.452.38 Big 100.22-5.01 ACC1.43-6.05 Oklahoma State53,814 Independent-16.79-0.36 Baylor45,838 AAC (Big East)-0.73-19.04 Conference% Change in Average (2015-2016)% Change in Average (2006-2016) Kansas State51,919 Texas Tech58,250 Conference USA-2.60-25.51 AdChoices广告For a Power Five conference that tries to market itself as the premier group of universities in the nation, having only two schools that average more than 60,000 fans a Saturday is not ideal. When comparing the Big 12 with the other power fives, it ranks at the bottom in total attendance. That mostly falls on the number of teams in the league vs. the others. Three of the Power Five leagues have 14 teams; the Pac-12 has a dozen, and the Big 12 has only 10.But even when the conference totals are averaged per game, the Big 12 ranks in the center among the power fives (this includes home and neutral site games between teams in the same conference).Five of the 10 Big 12 schools hover just below the Power Five average attendance line of 61,024. Those universities include Oklahoma State at 53,814. And these attendance more or less line up with the hierarchy of revenue generated by each conference.Even the Big 12 data set has its cut of outliers, though. Because math, Kansas (25,828 average), Oklahoma (86,857) and Texas (97,881) are all outside of the qualified data set. If you remember from statistics class, you throw outliers out, which means the true attendance average in the Big 12 is actually 52,161.So, in a sense, when Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said, “I think our league has the best depth,” at Media Days, he is absolutely correct. When analyzing the distribution of average university attendances, the Big 12 is far and away the most concentrated with seven of 10 schools within a 20,000-attendee range.But the perception of those numbers is up to the beholder. The SEC has four universities that average more than 100,000 people through the turnstiles every week. You’re getting a more competitive and more consistent league in the Big 12, at least from an attendance standpoint, but you’re also getting far fewer people overall.Going to a college football game is becoming less popular across the nation. The Mountain West Conference has dropped more than 26 percent in its average attendance since 2006. That’s the extreme, but all except two other conferences are down in average attendance numbers from a decade ago. The SEC and Sun Belt Conference are the only two leagues to report any positive growth. Big 120.32-2.44 West Virginia57,583 MAC7.02-7.37 These numbers are not wildly surprising. TV deals have made it incredibly easy and sometimes more enjoyable to stay home or in the parking lot for the game. Couple that with a mind-boggling spike in ticket prices, only those with a pretty lofty disposable income can and will go to games anymore.For example, the median price for a Bedlam ticket last year was $190, according to Forbes. And that was cheap that week. Two other games posted higher median prices, including Michigan-Ohio State.Average Big 12 attendance is down 2.44 percent. That doesn’t sound like a lot, but that comes out to more than 1,400 fewer people per game. That’s almost 100,000 people over the 66 conference games that were played last season. Not that Big 12 teams (or any teams) are hurting for money, but that’s a lot of lost revenue over the course of several years.And the world is becoming more technologically sound by the day, and it’s astonishing. Bowlsby ranted about 250 words on it at Big 12 Media Days before attempting to address how it would impact the conference.“Does that have an effect on whether we have bigger venues or smaller venues?” Bowlsby said. “Well, I think you look, and the trend is towards smaller football stadiums, smaller basketball venues because more people are consuming away from the venue. And I think we need to be concerned about that.”Bowlsby said students and millennials are those of particular concern with the change away from live, in-person sporting events but didn’t have any direct plan to combat that and keep butts in seats.“How it’s going to be distributed? I mean, we may be watching the Super Bowl on the insides of our eyelids before too long,” he said. “I wish I knew that answer, but I think the best things we can do is partner with people that are on the cutting edge and ride along as they answer those questions.”Smaller stadiums is both the trend and the answer. At OSU, Boone Pickens Stadium recently was shrunk from 60,218, down to 56,790 to create more room for fans, said Andy Sumrall, OSU’s assistant athletic director of ticket operations.“Some of the biggest issues we have come from someone sitting on my seat or half of my seat,” Sumrall told the Tulsa World. “Seats are just too close together.”That is half of the story though. There has only been one true sellout at BPS, and it came in 2013 against Baylor. So a decrease in seating capacity essentially means a better (more comfortable experience), more sellouts and potentially higher ticket prices to make up that revenue.Will that work? Who knows. The NFL is on Amazon now Thursday nights, so why even lounge in your recliner anymore? These are unanswerable questions in 2017, like Bowlsby said. But so long as nothing is done to answer them, Big 12 attendance will only continue to slip lower on the national scale. Kansas25,828 Mountain West1.05-26.35 With new TV deals years away and as plans to add more teams to the conference fall off the face of the planet, the organic growth of the Big 12 is going stagnant. Attendance is part of the internal expansion of any conference, and in the Big 12, it has become a problem.This doesn’t necessarily diverge from a nation-wide trend. But first, let’s take a look at what each team in the Big 12 averaged in home attendance last season.Big 12 Attendance (2016) Iowa State52,557 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more